Review: Paul the Apostle from Beartruth Collective

Paul_the_ApostleBeing obsessive compulsive I am seriously bothered by not walking up and down each and every aisle at any given event. From garage sales to street markets, I want to see all
possible booths before I decide I am officially done for the day. Sometimes I go home having only gained much-needed exercise, and other times I find a gem tucked amidst the crowd. At one such recent conference I had the pleasure of discovering Paul the Apostle from Beartruth Collective, and it made my day!

Beartruth Collective believes in the power of the Gospel and teaching children the true Word of God. Using the medium of comic books, their mission is to share Jesus Christ with the world. The Beginning, Noah, Moses, and, my recent find, Paul the Apostle are only a few of the titles currently available.

“…Our intention has always been one of ministry and education. We’re using a science fiction visual language to illuminate the story of Paul the Apostle and ultimately, the life-transforming message of Christ Jesus…”
~ Beartruth Collective

Paul the Apostle is a science fiction adaptation of the Biblical, historical story of Paul from the book of Acts. Its beautifully illustrated pages take us through Paul’s conversion, his ministry for God’s kingdom, and ultimately his arrest. Throughout Paul the Apostle, helpful Scriptural references are found as footnotes leading readers to the Bible, encouraging them to read God’s truth for themselves. Suggested for children ages 7-15, Paul the Apostle is a hardcover graphic novel with full-color illustrations. Told using cleverly imagined creature characters and set in a futuristic world, Paul the Apostle will draw in children while teaching about this amazing Bible hero.

In addition to fulfilling my quota of steps for the day, this summer’s homeschool conference provided us the opportunity to meet Mr. Mario DeMatteo, publisher of Paul the Apostle, and our first glimpse of this fantastic graphic novel. Several weeks later Mr. DeMatteo kindly offered us a copy of Paul the Apostle, and we haven’t put it down since. Paul the Apostle arrived fairly quickly, and while I had intentions of sitting down with my new read later that same day, my adventurer tackled the graphic novel before I had the opportunity. I finally found a quite moment to read it myself; after which I began reading through it once more with my son.

I’ll be honest and admit it was the imaginative, colorful illustrations which initially caught my eye when seeing Paul the Apostle. However, after taking just a few moments to look within its pages, I was drawn into the story. It is Beartruth Collective’s heart for the gospel which has us sharing this incredible graphic novel with all our friends. Never have we seen the story of Paul told in such a unique manner.

Paul the Apostle is set in a futuristic world, and we found this to be incredibly fun; as were the creature characters! As both parent and educator, my favorite aspect of the graphic novel was the multitude of Scriptural references found as footnotes throughout. Practically every page leads readers to the Word of God and His truth. What a fantastic tool in teaching our children to search the Scriptures for themselves!

My obsessive desire to look at everything has once again paid off, and in a big way. We are so excited about Paul the Apostle and the ministry happening at Beartruth Collective. We know God is going to do amazing things using this ministry, and we’re looking forward to following their journey; reading the many other valuable comics they continue to create.

If you’d like to learn more about Paul the Apostle or Beartruth Collective please visit them at their website, and on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram!

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Your Turn!: Did you have a favorite graphic novel growing up?

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Reading Books Before Watching Movies

Reading_Books_Before_Watching_MoviesWith the coming release of Murder on the Orient Express, a household policy is being resurrected. Before we can watch the movie, we need to read the book. Thus, as a family, we will be hunting down a copy from the local library and indulging in this ageless story.

While the kids will occasionally groan and complain about our movie/book policy, I believe they understand its importance. If they were to watch the movie first, it is highly doubtful the book would ever be read. Now that they “know the story”, why should they bother with spending hours reading it? If they read the books first, they will have a better understanding of the story and often appreciate the movie even more. There are no details that have been cut or unnecessary additions, it is enjoyed as the author intended.

While on occasion our children have liked the movie just as much as the book, I have yet to hear that they enjoy a movie more. They have always appreciated the books much more than the films.

In the past, one fun way we have helped encourage our children to read through their books is to reward them with a “special viewing” of the corresponding film. Once the book has been finished, the movie is rented and they are allowed to stay up later than the other kids and watch the film with mom and dad. Each child, in turn, is allowed the same privilege once a book has been completed. We have done this with the Narnia series, Bridge to Tarabithia, City of Ember, The Hunger Games, and several others!

Our children not only breeze through these books, but we then have the opportunity to critically think about each selection. How did the movie compare to the book? Which similarities or differences were noticed? Was there a lesson to be learned? While reading the books has been an essential part of our lives, watching the movies has definitely added something to our learning.

While I am sure we have neglected a few books along the way, we have been very faithful to our book policy. When we come across a new movie for our amusement, the question always arises, “Do we read the book before watching the film?” But, yes, of course!

“I will set no wicked thing before mine eyes”
~Psalm 101:3

Your Turn!: What is your family’s favorite rendition of a film based off a book?

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Our October Reads

Our_October_Reads

October isn’t quite over, but we can’t wait to share this month’s short list of incredible reads with you. It never ceases to amaze us how many books we finish in a month. The lists we share here are merely books we’ve used in a homeschooling/parenting capacity; there are many more which we read on our own! October’s list has a few reads which are making a major impact on our learning routine, and others which are helping us glean the most from our nature studies. Everything on this month’s list was absolutely fantastic!

  1. The Fallacy Detective (Nathaniel Bluedorn) – Thirty-eight lessons on how to recognize bad reasoning. Learn to spot errors in others’ logic, and your own. Learn to identify red herrings, circular reasoning, statistical fallacies, and propaganda. Each lesson presents several examples of poor reasoning often illustrated by cartoons and then provides an exercise set in which you identify the fallacies. This book features a Christian view of logic and was written by homeschoolers for homeschoolers.
    Several homeschool families suggested this book. Going on faith we purchased a copy and started it near the end of this month. The book is very simple, but it is a good starting off point for young learners or those new to logic.We should also note this book deals with informal fallacies, not formal logic. That said, we cannot begin to express how much we are enjoying the lessons and how much we’re learning. It’s fantastic!
  2. The Thinking Toolbox (Nathaniel Bluedorn) – Just as you use the wrench in a regular tool box to fix the sink, so you can use the tools we give you in this book to solve thinking problems. The Thinking Toolbox follows the same style as The Fallacy Detective with lessons, exercises and an answer key in the back.
    We purchased this book as well, hoping it would be a good companion to The Fallacy Detective and were not disappointed. The lessons are short, of benefit, and offer great discussion points. I’m so glad we invested in both of these. 
  3. Audubon Guides (National Audubon Society) – The full-color identification photographs show creatures as they appear in natural habitats.
    While we’re sure most of you have come across these books before, we noted we’ve never mentioned them being used in our learning and wished to add them to our list. Lately they’ve been making a strong appearance in our nature studies. We love the multitude of photos and information to be found within. If we had the room and finances, I’d love to own more. 
  4. This Beautiful Day (Richard Jackson) – Why spend a rainy day inside? As three children embrace a grey day, they seems to beckon the bright as they jump, splash, and dance outside, chasing the rain away. The day’s palette shifts from greys to a hint of blue, then more blue. Then green! Then yellow! Until the day is a Technicolor extravaganza that would make Mary Poppins proud. A joyous homage to the power of a positive attitude.
    An online recommendation we found at our local library! We loved the artistic appeal of this picture book, and the gentle reminder to be creative with our free time. A great library find. 
  5. The Shape of the World: A Portrait of Frank Lloyd Wright (KL Going) – A little boy who loves to find shapes in nature grows up to be one of America’s greatest architects in this inspiring biography of Frank Lloyd Wright.
    I’m a fan of Frank Lloyd Wright. I have been for years. So when an online book forum suggested this read, I quickly found it at our local library. We loved learning of Wright’s childhood, and how his love of nature influenced his future work. The artwork in the book is a little wanting, but the concept is lovely; as is the short story itself. 
  6. The Beetle Book (Steve Jenkins) – Beetles squeak and beetles glow.
    Beetles stink, beetles sprint, beetles walk on water. With legs, antennae, horns, beautiful shells, knobs, and other oddities—what’s not to like about beetles?
    Nature books are a weakness for us. We found this gem while scouring the local library for nature study and couldn’t be happier. The illustrations are lovely, and the pages are overflowing with facts to amaze learners. 

We generally gather our reading materials from the library, but most of these were suggestions from other homeschooling friends and online acquaintances. Who knew Instagram would be a source of book inspiration?

Join us again next month as we explore a world of literature and the adventure of reading!

Your Turn!: How many Audubon guides do you own?

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Our September Reads

Our_September_Reads

It never ceases to amaze us how many books we finish in a month. The lists we share here are merely books we’ve used in a homeschooling/parenting capacity; there are many more which we read on our own! September’s list are entirely from our local library, although a few were special requests. Everything on this month’s list was completely new to us, which is always fun.

  1. Women In Sports: 50 Fearless Athletes Who Played to Win (Rachel Ignotofsky) – A fascinating collection full of striking, singular art, Women in Sports features 50 profiles and illustrated portraits of women athletes from the 1800s to today including trailblazers, Olympians, and record-breakers in more than 40 different sports. The book also contains info graphics about relevant topics such as muscle anatomy, a timeline of women’s participation in sports, statistics about women in athletics, and influential female teams.
    Having read Women in Science, we were excited for this newest release. While it was interesting to read about these fascinating women, it definitely had a more feminist slant than the first book. It’s worth a look.

  2. Junior Genius Guides (Ken Jennings) – Unleash your inner genius and become a master of mythology with this interactive trivia book from Jeopardy! champ and New York Times bestselling author Ken Jennings.
    This series is wonderful! We discovered them through an Instagram recommendation and we’re glad we took their suggestion seriously and found them at our local library. They grace our homeschool table and all the kids enjoy perusing them throughout the day. We were blessed in being able to find all seven and they’re all great!
  3. Around the World in Numbers (Clive Gifford) – Did you know there were about 10,000 light bulbs on the Titanic? Or that the Eiffel Tower is repainted every seven years—using 1,500 paintbrushes and 60 tons of paint? This engaging collection of statistics encourages kids’ curiosity by sharing some unbelievable numerical facts from across the globe.
    Another Instagram recommendation. I am drawn to picture books and this one caught my eye. It’s short, but incredible worthwhile. There are so many tidbits of information hidden in this book you’ll need to read it more than once to get them all. 
  4. The Adventures of Your Brain (Dan Green) – How does the brain work? What does it do, and what do we understand about it? The Adventures of Your Brain allows kids to explore this amazing and amazingly complex part of our body. Each page offers loads of fun features to play with, so kids will love learning all the fascinating facts!
    We appreciate being inspired by other homeschoolers. This one was also featured on Instagram and purchased through our local library. We love the interactive pages and the detail which went into creating this book. The bonus is that it’s a pop-up!
  5. 100 Years of Solitude (Gabriel Garcia Marquez) – One Hundred Years of Solitude tells the story of the rise and fall, birth and death of a mythical town of Macondo through the history of the Buendia family.
    It’s been mentioned we might not fully appreciate this story because we don’t understand the history surrounding the tale. Perhaps this might be true. I don’t know. What I DO know, is that every single person in my book club who signed up to read it, hated it. Including myself. The worst part was I wanted to like it, but couldn’t get past the vulgarity – which I understand is purposeful – and insanity of the main characters. Perhaps next month’s read will be more enjoyable?

We generally gather our reading materials from the library, but several of these have been added to our personal wish list for the home. Who knew Instagram would be a source of book inspiration? Even adults can enjoy a good picture book!

Join us again next month as we explore a world of literature and the adventure of reading!

Your Turn!: Have you ever read a “classic” or an award-winning book only to find it wasn’t all it was built up to be?

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Review: The Secret of the Hidden Scrolls by Worthy Kids/Ideals

Review_The_Secret_of_the_ScrollsThis month God seems to be wanting to remind our little family of something vital. He is in control. All He asks is that we trust Him. The Secret of the Hidden Scrolls by Worthy Kids/Ideals came at a perfect time to remind us of these truths and encourage our children to dig deeper into their Bibles.

Worthy Publishing Group is an established book company whose mission is, “To help people experience the heart of God.” Of their five distinct imprints and vast selection of titles, Worthy Kids/Ideals creates vibrant children’s literature including The Secret of the Hidden Scrolls. The series has only begun with the following incredible reads:

The Secret of the Hidden Scrolls: The Beginning (Book #1) Peter, Mary, and their dog, Hank, find themselves spending a month with their Great-Uncle Solomon while their parents are off on a mission trip to Africa. After discovering their great-uncle is an archeologist, the kids begin to explore the house hoping to find something fun to occupy their time, and learn of the Legend of the Secret Scrolls hidden in Solomon’s home. According to Great-Uncle Solomon, only the chosen will hear “the lion” call and be allowed to open the scrolls, being transported back in time to discover amazing truths from God.
Sometime during their first night, the children hear a lion and rush off in hopes of excitement. What happens next is a tale of adventure, discovery, and Biblical lessons as the two children and their faithful pet find themselves experiencing creation first hand, all while attempting to discover the secret of their first scroll and steering clear of Satan. In this first incredible tale, Peter and Mary learn the valuable lesson that, “God Created Everything”.

The Secret of the Hidden Scrolls: Race to the Ark (Book #2) It’s been three days since Peter and Mary experienced creation first hand, and they are impatient for another adventure to begin. As rain pours down, the children begin to wonder if they will ever be allowed to open another scroll. When a game of fetch with their dog, Hank, sends them scrambling through the house, the trio discover a journal written by their Great-Uncle Solomon detailing his adventures as an archeologist. Just as Solomon is about to share his stories with the children, they all hear “the lion” roar!
The trio’s second scroll takes them back to the time of Noah. The children learn Noah has been building the Ark for over 100 years, but time is running short. In just seven days the world will be flooded, and Noah needs help finishing the Ark and gathering the last of the animals into cages. This seems a simple task until the children learn Satan will do anything he can to stop Noah from finishing. It doesn’t help that he also wishes to prevent the children from discovering the newest scroll’s secret. In this amazing second tale, Peter, Mary, and Hank learn to, “Trust God. He Will Rescue You!”

The Secret of the Hidden Scrolls are paperback books, suggested for children ages 6-9 with reading levels between first to third grades. While all of my children are out of this age range, I very much wished to explore these reads given the history of the publishing company itself and the lovely illustrations gracing the front covers. Thus, I was willing to overlook the suggested age range and read the books for myself. I read through quickly, finishing both in a little less than an hour. Afterwards, I passed the books off to my ten-year-old son. He finished each book in approximately an hour. We believe the suggested age range is fitting, while the story itself is enjoyable even for older readers. At the end of each story, you’ll find a section which offers helpful information to those who wish to read more. Each book details where you can find passages in Scripture relating to the story.

While we often find judging a book by its cover to be unwise, we are happy to announce The Secret of the Hidden Scrolls series is as lovely as it looks! Both stories were enjoyable from beginning to end. The characters were well thought-out and relatable. The stories well-written and entertaining. Honestly, we can’t say enough good things about these books. Our only complaint… When will there be more?!

The Lord definitely wanted to use this month to remind us of His wonderful creation and our need to trust in Him. This is the second story of Noah’s Ark we’ve read, and we’re encouraged that God is in control. The Secret of the Hidden Scrolls were fantastic reads and a blessing to our family.

If you’d like to learn more about The Secret of the Hidden Scrolls by M.J. Thomas or WorthyKids/Ideals please visit them at their website and on FacebookTwitter or Instagram! To read helpful reviews like this one, and gain more insight into what The Secret of the Hidden Scrolls by M.J. Thomas has to offer, please visit The Homeschool Review Crew!

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Your Turn!: In The Beginning, Peter and Mary are able to ride dangerous animals as if they were ponies. If you could ride on the back of any wild animal, which would it be?

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Review: Imagine…The Great Flood

Imagine_ReviewWe’re constantly on the lookout for clean stories which edify our children and build their faith. While reading Imagine…The Great Flood by Matt Koceic from Barbour Publishing, we were reminded to trust upon the Lord no matter our circumstances and that God is always in control.

Barbour Publishing might have its roots in being a small remainder seller of books, but recent years have proven them a reliable source for some of the best Christian books on the market. Amongst their vast collection of Christian kids’ book titles, Imagine…The Great Flood by Matt Koceic, part of the I Survived series, encourages children to explore the Biblical story of Noah’s Ark.

Imagine. . .The Great Flood tells the story of ten-year-old Corey Max and his struggle with trusting God when facing new circumstances. Corey’s family is looking to make a big move, and Corey fears what the future will bring. While playing at the park with his dog and discussing the coming changes with his mother, Corey experiences an accident which causes him to black out. Upon waking, he discovers he is no longer in the park. Instead, he is in Mesopotamia, and the year is 2400BC. There Corey meets Shem and hears about Noah’s mission to build an ark. Together with Shem, Ham, and Japheth Corey helps gather animals into the ark while trying to avoid the giant Nephilim and Elizar, an unusual man who claims to have powers, who wish to thwart Noah at all costs. During the midst of his adventures, Corey learns what it means to trust God no matter the circumstances and that God always knows what’s best.

Imagine. . .The Great Flood is a short, easy read. As the main character, Corey, is the same age as my son, I thought this would be a lovely story to enjoy together. I read the book myself, then shared it with my little boy. We found the story to be a quick read, finishing the entire book in a little less than an hour. The book is suggested for ages 8-12 and we believe this fits perfectly. While a retelling of the Noah’s Ark story, it was a fast paced read which kept us entertained and engaged.

The fears which Corey expressed about moving were heartfelt. One of my son’s close friends recently moved quite a distance and this story mirrored a few of their own worries. A favorite scene from the book takes place upon Corey’s first arrival in Mesopotamia and a meeting with lions. Instead of pouncing to attack Corey, the lions express a desire to be close to him and be affectionate. We found this charming and wondered what that might be like, having a large vicious animal act as a typical house cat might. We also found it interesting Corey tells Shem he is from the future and there is no surprised reaction. Shem receives this knowledge with great calmness and expresses no desire to know anything, entirely trusting God to see them through. Would we have responded in the same manner? The addition of the character Elizar was interesting. He seemed to be a physical representation of Satan’s evil doing and control during this period of history. The presence of this character did require a review of the actual story, with brief reminders of what the Bible teaches and the difference between the two. However, this did not detract from our enjoyment of the story as a whole.

Imagine. . .The Great Flood was a fun story. We’re constantly on the lookout for clean reading for kids and this was a perfect fit. We appreciated the gentle reminders to trust the Lord no matter our circumstance and that God always knows best. An altogether enjoyable book!

If you’d like to learn more about Imagine. . .The Great Flood by Matt Koceich or Barbour Publishing please visit them at their website and on FacebookTwitter or YouTube! To read helpful reviews like this one, and gain more insight into what Imagine. . .The Great Flood by Matt Koceich has to offer, please visit The Homeschool Review Crew!

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Your Turn!: Which Biblical, historical, event would you have liked to experience?

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Our August Reads

Our_August_Reads_2017

It never ceases to amaze us how many books we finish in a month. The lists we share here are merely books we’ve used in a homeschooling/parenting capacity; there are many more which we read on our own! August’s list has several finds from our local library. Everything on this month’s list was completely new to us, which is always fun.

  1. My Side of the Mountain – Trilogy (Jean Craighead George) – This coming-of-age story about a boy and his falcon went on to win a Newbery Honor, and for the past forty years has enthralled and entertained generations of would-be Sam Gribleys. The two books that followed–On the Far Side of the Mountain and Frightful’s Mountain–were equally extraordinary.
    This was an assigned read for my son. He fought me at first, but quickly began to enjoy the story. I’m sure many of you have already read this charming story. It’s a classic for a reason.
  2. 100 Birds and How They Got Their Names (Diana Wells) – Learn the mythical stories of the gods and goddess associated with bird names. Explore the avian emblems used by our greatest writers–from Coleridge’s albatross in “The Ancient Mariner” to Poe’s raven.
    Part of our nature study focus for the month of August, this book took us by surprise. Where we expected to find dry facts, we discovered lovely detail and fun facts.
  3. The Periodic Kingdom (PW Atkins) – Just how does the periodic table help us make sense of the world around us? Using vivid imagery, ingenious analogies, and liberal doses of humor P. W. Atkins answers this question. He shows us that the Periodic Kingdom is a systematic place. Detailing the geography, history and governing institutions of this imaginary landscape, he demonstrates how physical similarities can point to deeper affinities, and how the location of an element can be used to predict its properties. Here’s an opportunity to discover a rich kingdom of the imagination kingdom of which our own world is a manifestation.
    In my attempt to make chemistry more appealing – as exploding experiments are not as easy to come by as my children would like – we were led to this book. The author does a fine job of fully explaining the periodic table, making it a land of possibility and a joy to discover.
  4. Bees: A Honeyed History (Piotr Socha) – How does bees communicate?… What does a beekeeper actually do? Who survived being stung by 2,443 bees? This encyclopedic book answers all those questions and many more with a light, humorous touch.
    Well-illustrated books are a draw for us. Even if that was the only pull, this book would be worth a second look. However, we’re blessed to announce the educational pages within are just as wonderful as the illustrations. (It should be noted the author is not writing from a young-earth perspective. Expect to see the phrase “millions of years ago” and the like. Just to you know.)
  5. Atlas of Adventures (Rachel Williams) – Set your spirit of adventure free with this lavishly illustrated trip around the world. Whether you’re visiting the penguins of Antarctica, joining the Carnival in Brazil, or a canoe safari down the Zambezi River, this book brings together more than 100 activities and challenges to inspire armchair adventurers of any age.
    I think I might have developed a thing for maps. And globes. Which I suppose is technically about the same thing. Atlas books are high on my list right now and I appreciate each and every one. This one is especially charming; filled with unexpected, fun details about each region of the planet.
  6. Atlas of Animal Adventures (Rachel Williams) – From the team behind the best-selling Atlas of Adventures. Head off on a journey of discovery, with this book that collects together nature’s most unmissable events from between the two poles, including epic migrations, extraordinary behaviours, and Herculean habits. Find hundreds of things to spot and learn new facts about every animal.Yet another spectacular atlas from Ms. Williams. I’ll be holding onto this read until the library demands it be returned. Or I’ve bought my own. Whichever comes first. 

We generally gather our reading materials from the library, and several of these have been added to our personal book wish list. Great reads are worth revisiting!  We were so excited to find another incredible selection this month! A few of them were excellent aids in nature study. Join us again next month as we explore a world of literature and the adventure of reading.

Your Turn!: Do you have a favorite focus for nature study? We’d love to hear all about it.

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A Homeschool Mom’s Favorite STEM Books

AHM_STEAM_ReadsFollowing our list of favorite nature books, we thought it would be fun to share the few books we check out on a regular basis which relate to a STEM or STEAM line of study. As we feel our general course of learning does a great job of covering these areas of education fairly well, the list is not terribly long. But, you know us, we’re constantly looking and continually adding.

We know a multitude of books cover this topic. The list you find below is by no means exhaustive. Give is a look and see what we might be missing:

A moment of truth here… I find the acronym STEM, or STEAM, a bit frustrating. After all, doesn’t STEAM cover pretty much everything our children are supposed to be learning? One or two subjects aside. I’m confused over how this term is at all special. I was under the impression we’d been teaching these things all along. I know our general course of curriculum covers science, basic engineering, mathematics, and art. Even technology is discussed and explored over the course of our learning. I would even argue that literature and history are taught using this model as well, as we read about the history each genre. They are in our household. I’m going on the assumption most other homeschoolers are as well. How is STEM different from what we’re already doing? Something to think upon further.

While our normal course of study does a wonderful job of covering STEAM to a good degree, it is fun gathering additional reading materials which bolster these topics for our children. The few books we check out on a regular basis are favorites, and ones we’ll continue to enjoy again and again.

“Great are the works of the LORD; They are studied by all who delight in them.”
~ Psalm 111:2

Your Turn!: Share your favorite STEM/STEAM books! Which would you recommend we read?

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A Homeschool Mom’s Favorite Nature Books

AHM_Favorite_Nature_BooksNine times out of ten, my children would rather be learning in the field. There is something about being out-of-doors which opens the mind and heart to learning. Unfortunately, as this post is being written in the last days of summer and we’re generally a good hour and a half from any decent nature center, this isn’t much of an option. Thus, we turn to our second best option – and always a viable one – books! Today, we’re exploring our favorite nature books and asking you to help us add to our growing list.

We’re sure an abundance of nature books exist. An entire section at our library can quickly attest to this. But there are a few which rise above the rest, making them invaluable to our learning and inspiring to the soul. These few either currently grace our home shelves or are begging to be added:

Whew! Quite the list, isn’t it? We’re sure we haven’t even come close to being finished with adding to it. There are just so many lovely reads waiting for us to bring them home.

Learning in the field might currently be on hold, but plans are underway to get us back into the wild outdoors and explore God’s creation. For now, we will content ourselves with admiring the pages within these magnificent books and dreaming of all the outdoor adventures to be had once cool weather comes our way. Well, cooler, anyhow.

“But now ask the beasts, and let them teach you; And the birds of the heavens, and let them tell you.”
~ Job 12:7

Your Turn!: Share your favorite nature books! Which would you recommend we read?

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Review: Wicked Bugs by Amy Stewart (Young Readers Edition)

Wicked_Bugs_ReviewBetween all our nature walks and exploring of the great outdoors we come across some very interesting creatures. I wish I was better at identifying all of them, knowing details on their structure and tidbits of fun facts my children might enjoy. So when Algonquin Young Readers contacted us and offered a copy of their young readers edition of Wicked Bugs: The Meanest, Deadliest, Grossest Bugs on Earth we were overjoyed. Today, we’d love to share this incredibly fun and educational resource with you!

In the young readers edition of Wicked Bugs: The Meanest, Deadliest, Grossest Bugs on Earth, Amy Stewart’s information-packed, impeccably researched New York Times bestselling book for adults has been adapted for middle grade readers, bringing to life weird and dangerous creatures with full-color illustrations by the talented Briony Morrow-Cribbs. Organized into thematic categories (“Everyday Dangers”, “Unwelcome Invaders”, “Destructive Pests”, and “Terrible Threats”), Wicked Bugs entertains as much as it informs, delving into the extraordinary powers of many-legged creatures.

Algonquin Young Readers graciously sent us an early release copy of Wicked Bugs. When our book arrived, included in our package was an illustrated leaflet advertising the book’s release on August 8th of this year and an oddly adorable stuffed bookworm by Giant Microbes.

Before turning our attention to Wicked Bugs, we took a moment or two to giggle over our newest stuffed animal. I confess I have never actually seen a live bookworm, much less one which is stuffed. This was a special treat! We then took a moment to peruse the included leaflet to get a preview of what was to come in our new book. Wicked Bugs isGiantMicrobes_Bookworm
filled with chapter after chapter of intriguing creepy, crawly creatures. The book is incredibly thorough, giving fun details children of all ages will appreciate. The full-color illustrations are liberally peppered throughout the read, adding an up close look at our nature friends.

Wicked Bugs is an incredible resource. We very much enjoyed reading about each intriguing insect. One of our favorite chapters included “Zombies”, a truly chilling selection of insects which inhabit other creatures and force them to do harm on their behalf. The “Death Watch Beetle”, referred to by Edgar Allan Poe in his frightful story “The Tell-Tale Heart” was fun as well. Many such educational factoids may be found following the colorful descriptions of each bug.

While I shudder at the thought of running into any of these mean, deadly, gross bugs in real life, we truly enjoy this read. The illustrations are wonderful and add to the charm of the book. The book itself is a simple read. While intended for middle grade readers, we believe young readers would appreciate having selections read to them; removing the barrier of hard to pronounce scientific names.

Before setting Wicked Bugs on the bookshelf and adding it to our nature section for continual referral, we definitely wished to take a moment to visit the Wicked Bugs website. Who knew what exciting adventures, resources, and activities might be available? We were not disappointed. We found a downloadable lesson plan for Wicked Bugs, discovered where Wicked Bugs have been viewed as part of a national traveling exhibit, read a special Q&A session with Amy Stewart, and viewed the Wicked Bugs trailer. The trailer is definitely a highlight of the site!

While I certainly hope we never run into any of these “Wicked Bugs” while on our nature walks or outdoor explorations, it has been tons of fun learning about God’s creatures and adding tidbits of knowledge to our homeschool adventure. We’re very pleased to add Wicked Bugs to our growing nature studies resource shelf!

In addition to Wicked Bugs, Amy Stewart has written several other fascinating reads including The Drunken Botanist, Wicked Plants, and Flower Confidential. To learn more about Amy Stewart, Algonquin Young Readers, and Wicked Bugs, please visit their websites or follow on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, Google+, and more!

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Your Turn!: What’s the “meanest” bug you’ve discovered in your learning adventure?

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