Our September Reads

Our_September_Reads

It never ceases to amaze us how many books we finish in a month. The lists we share here are merely books we’ve used in a homeschooling/parenting capacity; there are many more which we read on our own! September’s list are entirely from our local library, although a few were special requests. Everything on this month’s list was completely new to us, which is always fun.

  1. Women In Sports: 50 Fearless Athletes Who Played to Win (Rachel Ignotofsky) – A fascinating collection full of striking, singular art, Women in Sports features 50 profiles and illustrated portraits of women athletes from the 1800s to today including trailblazers, Olympians, and record-breakers in more than 40 different sports. The book also contains info graphics about relevant topics such as muscle anatomy, a timeline of women’s participation in sports, statistics about women in athletics, and influential female teams.
    Having read Women in Science, we were excited for this newest release. While it was interesting to read about these fascinating women, it definitely had a more feminist slant than the first book. It’s worth a look.

  2. Junior Genius Guides (Ken Jennings) – Unleash your inner genius and become a master of mythology with this interactive trivia book from Jeopardy! champ and New York Times bestselling author Ken Jennings.
    This series is wonderful! We discovered them through an Instagram recommendation and we’re glad we took their suggestion seriously and found them at our local library. They grace our homeschool table and all the kids enjoy perusing them throughout the day. We were blessed in being able to find all seven and they’re all great!
  3. Around the World in Numbers (Clive Gifford) – Did you know there were about 10,000 light bulbs on the Titanic? Or that the Eiffel Tower is repainted every seven years—using 1,500 paintbrushes and 60 tons of paint? This engaging collection of statistics encourages kids’ curiosity by sharing some unbelievable numerical facts from across the globe.
    Another Instagram recommendation. I am drawn to picture books and this one caught my eye. It’s short, but incredible worthwhile. There are so many tidbits of information hidden in this book you’ll need to read it more than once to get them all. 
  4. The Adventures of Your Brain (Dan Green) – How does the brain work? What does it do, and what do we understand about it? The Adventures of Your Brain allows kids to explore this amazing and amazingly complex part of our body. Each page offers loads of fun features to play with, so kids will love learning all the fascinating facts!
    We appreciate being inspired by other homeschoolers. This one was also featured on Instagram and purchased through our local library. We love the interactive pages and the detail which went into creating this book. The bonus is that it’s a pop-up!
  5. 100 Years of Solitude (Gabriel Garcia Marquez) – One Hundred Years of Solitude tells the story of the rise and fall, birth and death of a mythical town of Macondo through the history of the Buendia family.
    It’s been mentioned we might not fully appreciate this story because we don’t understand the history surrounding the tale. Perhaps this might be true. I don’t know. What I DO know, is that every single person in my book club who signed up to read it, hated it. Including myself. The worst part was I wanted to like it, but couldn’t get past the vulgarity – which I understand is purposeful – and insanity of the main characters. Perhaps next month’s read will be more enjoyable?

We generally gather our reading materials from the library, but several of these have been added to our personal wish list for the home. Who knew Instagram would be a source of book inspiration? Even adults can enjoy a good picture book!

Join us again next month as we explore a world of literature and the adventure of reading!

Your Turn!: Have you ever read a “classic” or an award-winning book only to find it wasn’t all it was built up to be?

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Review: The Secret of the Hidden Scrolls by Worthy Kids/Ideals

Review_The_Secret_of_the_ScrollsThis month God seems to be wanting to remind our little family of something vital. He is in control. All He asks is that we trust Him. The Secret of the Hidden Scrolls by Worthy Kids/Ideals came at a perfect time to remind us of these truths and encourage our children to dig deeper into their Bibles.

Worthy Publishing Group is an established book company whose mission is, “To help people experience the heart of God.” Of their five distinct imprints and vast selection of titles, Worthy Kids/Ideals creates vibrant children’s literature including The Secret of the Hidden Scrolls. The series has only begun with the following incredible reads:

The Secret of the Hidden Scrolls: The Beginning (Book #1) Peter, Mary, and their dog, Hank, find themselves spending a month with their Great-Uncle Solomon while their parents are off on a mission trip to Africa. After discovering their great-uncle is an archeologist, the kids begin to explore the house hoping to find something fun to occupy their time, and learn of the Legend of the Secret Scrolls hidden in Solomon’s home. According to Great-Uncle Solomon, only the chosen will hear “the lion” call and be allowed to open the scrolls, being transported back in time to discover amazing truths from God.
Sometime during their first night, the children hear a lion and rush off in hopes of excitement. What happens next is a tale of adventure, discovery, and Biblical lessons as the two children and their faithful pet find themselves experiencing creation first hand, all while attempting to discover the secret of their first scroll and steering clear of Satan. In this first incredible tale, Peter and Mary learn the valuable lesson that, “God Created Everything”.

The Secret of the Hidden Scrolls: Race to the Ark (Book #2) It’s been three days since Peter and Mary experienced creation first hand, and they are impatient for another adventure to begin. As rain pours down, the children begin to wonder if they will ever be allowed to open another scroll. When a game of fetch with their dog, Hank, sends them scrambling through the house, the trio discover a journal written by their Great-Uncle Solomon detailing his adventures as an archeologist. Just as Solomon is about to share his stories with the children, they all hear “the lion” roar!
The trio’s second scroll takes them back to the time of Noah. The children learn Noah has been building the Ark for over 100 years, but time is running short. In just seven days the world will be flooded, and Noah needs help finishing the Ark and gathering the last of the animals into cages. This seems a simple task until the children learn Satan will do anything he can to stop Noah from finishing. It doesn’t help that he also wishes to prevent the children from discovering the newest scroll’s secret. In this amazing second tale, Peter, Mary, and Hank learn to, “Trust God. He Will Rescue You!”

The Secret of the Hidden Scrolls are paperback books, suggested for children ages 6-9 with reading levels between first to third grades. While all of my children are out of this age range, I very much wished to explore these reads given the history of the publishing company itself and the lovely illustrations gracing the front covers. Thus, I was willing to overlook the suggested age range and read the books for myself. I read through quickly, finishing both in a little less than an hour. Afterwards, I passed the books off to my ten-year-old son. He finished each book in approximately an hour. We believe the suggested age range is fitting, while the story itself is enjoyable even for older readers. At the end of each story, you’ll find a section which offers helpful information to those who wish to read more. Each book details where you can find passages in Scripture relating to the story.

While we often find judging a book by its cover to be unwise, we are happy to announce The Secret of the Hidden Scrolls series is as lovely as it looks! Both stories were enjoyable from beginning to end. The characters were well thought-out and relatable. The stories well-written and entertaining. Honestly, we can’t say enough good things about these books. Our only complaint… When will there be more?!

The Lord definitely wanted to use this month to remind us of His wonderful creation and our need to trust in Him. This is the second story of Noah’s Ark we’ve read, and we’re encouraged that God is in control. The Secret of the Hidden Scrolls were fantastic reads and a blessing to our family.

If you’d like to learn more about The Secret of the Hidden Scrolls by M.J. Thomas or WorthyKids/Ideals please visit them at their website and on FacebookTwitter or Instagram! To read helpful reviews like this one, and gain more insight into what The Secret of the Hidden Scrolls by M.J. Thomas has to offer, please visit The Homeschool Review Crew!

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Your Turn!: In The Beginning, Peter and Mary are able to ride dangerous animals as if they were ponies. If you could ride on the back of any wild animal, which would it be?

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Our August Reads

Our_August_Reads_2017

It never ceases to amaze us how many books we finish in a month. The lists we share here are merely books we’ve used in a homeschooling/parenting capacity; there are many more which we read on our own! August’s list has several finds from our local library. Everything on this month’s list was completely new to us, which is always fun.

  1. My Side of the Mountain – Trilogy (Jean Craighead George) – This coming-of-age story about a boy and his falcon went on to win a Newbery Honor, and for the past forty years has enthralled and entertained generations of would-be Sam Gribleys. The two books that followed–On the Far Side of the Mountain and Frightful’s Mountain–were equally extraordinary.
    This was an assigned read for my son. He fought me at first, but quickly began to enjoy the story. I’m sure many of you have already read this charming story. It’s a classic for a reason.
  2. 100 Birds and How They Got Their Names (Diana Wells) – Learn the mythical stories of the gods and goddess associated with bird names. Explore the avian emblems used by our greatest writers–from Coleridge’s albatross in “The Ancient Mariner” to Poe’s raven.
    Part of our nature study focus for the month of August, this book took us by surprise. Where we expected to find dry facts, we discovered lovely detail and fun facts.
  3. The Periodic Kingdom (PW Atkins) – Just how does the periodic table help us make sense of the world around us? Using vivid imagery, ingenious analogies, and liberal doses of humor P. W. Atkins answers this question. He shows us that the Periodic Kingdom is a systematic place. Detailing the geography, history and governing institutions of this imaginary landscape, he demonstrates how physical similarities can point to deeper affinities, and how the location of an element can be used to predict its properties. Here’s an opportunity to discover a rich kingdom of the imagination kingdom of which our own world is a manifestation.
    In my attempt to make chemistry more appealing – as exploding experiments are not as easy to come by as my children would like – we were led to this book. The author does a fine job of fully explaining the periodic table, making it a land of possibility and a joy to discover.
  4. Bees: A Honeyed History (Piotr Socha) – How does bees communicate?… What does a beekeeper actually do? Who survived being stung by 2,443 bees? This encyclopedic book answers all those questions and many more with a light, humorous touch.
    Well-illustrated books are a draw for us. Even if that was the only pull, this book would be worth a second look. However, we’re blessed to announce the educational pages within are just as wonderful as the illustrations. (It should be noted the author is not writing from a young-earth perspective. Expect to see the phrase “millions of years ago” and the like. Just to you know.)
  5. Atlas of Adventures (Rachel Williams) – Set your spirit of adventure free with this lavishly illustrated trip around the world. Whether you’re visiting the penguins of Antarctica, joining the Carnival in Brazil, or a canoe safari down the Zambezi River, this book brings together more than 100 activities and challenges to inspire armchair adventurers of any age.
    I think I might have developed a thing for maps. And globes. Which I suppose is technically about the same thing. Atlas books are high on my list right now and I appreciate each and every one. This one is especially charming; filled with unexpected, fun details about each region of the planet.
  6. Atlas of Animal Adventures (Rachel Williams) – From the team behind the best-selling Atlas of Adventures. Head off on a journey of discovery, with this book that collects together nature’s most unmissable events from between the two poles, including epic migrations, extraordinary behaviours, and Herculean habits. Find hundreds of things to spot and learn new facts about every animal.Yet another spectacular atlas from Ms. Williams. I’ll be holding onto this read until the library demands it be returned. Or I’ve bought my own. Whichever comes first. 

We generally gather our reading materials from the library, and several of these have been added to our personal book wish list. Great reads are worth revisiting!  We were so excited to find another incredible selection this month! A few of them were excellent aids in nature study. Join us again next month as we explore a world of literature and the adventure of reading.

Your Turn!: Do you have a favorite focus for nature study? We’d love to hear all about it.

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A Homeschool Mom’s Favorite STEM Books

AHM_STEAM_ReadsFollowing our list of favorite nature books, we thought it would be fun to share the few books we check out on a regular basis which relate to a STEM or STEAM line of study. As we feel our general course of learning does a great job of covering these areas of education fairly well, the list is not terribly long. But, you know us, we’re constantly looking and continually adding.

We know a multitude of books cover this topic. The list you find below is by no means exhaustive. Give is a look and see what we might be missing:

A moment of truth here… I find the acronym STEM, or STEAM, a bit frustrating. After all, doesn’t STEAM cover pretty much everything our children are supposed to be learning? One or two subjects aside. I’m confused over how this term is at all special. I was under the impression we’d been teaching these things all along. I know our general course of curriculum covers science, basic engineering, mathematics, and art. Even technology is discussed and explored over the course of our learning. I would even argue that literature and history are taught using this model as well, as we read about the history each genre. They are in our household. I’m going on the assumption most other homeschoolers are as well. How is STEM different from what we’re already doing? Something to think upon further.

While our normal course of study does a wonderful job of covering STEAM to a good degree, it is fun gathering additional reading materials which bolster these topics for our children. The few books we check out on a regular basis are favorites, and ones we’ll continue to enjoy again and again.

“Great are the works of the LORD; They are studied by all who delight in them.”
~ Psalm 111:2

Your Turn!: Share your favorite STEM/STEAM books! Which would you recommend we read?

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A Homeschool Mom’s Favorite Nature Books

AHM_Favorite_Nature_BooksNine times out of ten, my children would rather be learning in the field. There is something about being out-of-doors which opens the mind and heart to learning. Unfortunately, as this post is being written in the last days of summer and we’re generally a good hour and a half from any decent nature center, this isn’t much of an option. Thus, we turn to our second best option – and always a viable one – books! Today, we’re exploring our favorite nature books and asking you to help us add to our growing list.

We’re sure an abundance of nature books exist. An entire section at our library can quickly attest to this. But there are a few which rise above the rest, making them invaluable to our learning and inspiring to the soul. These few either currently grace our home shelves or are begging to be added:

Whew! Quite the list, isn’t it? We’re sure we haven’t even come close to being finished with adding to it. There are just so many lovely reads waiting for us to bring them home.

Learning in the field might currently be on hold, but plans are underway to get us back into the wild outdoors and explore God’s creation. For now, we will content ourselves with admiring the pages within these magnificent books and dreaming of all the outdoor adventures to be had once cool weather comes our way. Well, cooler, anyhow.

“But now ask the beasts, and let them teach you; And the birds of the heavens, and let them tell you.”
~ Job 12:7

Your Turn!: Share your favorite nature books! Which would you recommend we read?

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Our July Reads, or The Series is The Thing

Our_July_Reads_2017

While this monthly post generally shares the list of books we’ve read during the current month, we’ve just noticed we haven’t yet returned the list of learning books we checked out last month. In fact, these same books have been gracing our shelves for several months and I have no intention of returning them until they force me. It might be time to break down and just buy them. Maybe. Instead, the family has chosen to spend this month focusing on various series we enjoy. Perhaps some of them have found their way into your home?

  1. Fablehaven (Brandon Mull) – For centuries mystical creatures of all description were gathered into a hidden refuge called Fablehaven to prevent their extinction. The sanctuary survives today as one of the last strongholds of true magic. Enchanting? Absolutely. Exciting? You bet. Safe? Well, actually, quite the opposite.
    This is a fun series my girls enjoyed. Every magical creature you could imagine is found within its pages. Very imaginative. 
  2. The Ranger’s Apprentice (John Flanagan) – They have always scared him in the past — the Rangers, with their dark cloaks and shadowy ways. The villagers believe the Rangers practice magic that makes them invisible to ordinary people. And now 15-year-old Will, always small for his age, has been chosen as a Ranger’s apprentice. What he doesn’t yet realize is that the Rangers are the protectors of the kingdom. Highly trained in the skills of battle and surveillance, they fight the battles before the battles reach the people. And as Will is about to learn, there is a large battle brewing. The exiled Morgarath, Lord of the Mountains of Rain and Night, is gathering his forces for an attack on the kingdom. This time, he will not be denied….
    My little lady didn’t know what to expect with this series and had misgivings at first. She quickly gained an appreciation of both characters and storyline. This series is long, but worth every page. 
  3. The School for Good & Evil (Soman Chainani) – This year, best friends Sophie and Agatha are about to discover where all the lost children go: the fabled School for Good & Evil, where ordinary boys and girls are trained to be fairy tale heroes and villains. As the most beautiful girl in Gavaldon, Sophie has dreamed of being kidnapped into an enchanted world her whole life. With her pink dresses, glass slippers, and devotion to good deeds, she knows she’ll earn top marks at the School for Good and graduate a storybook princess. Meanwhile Agatha, with her shapeless black frocks, wicked pet cat, and dislike of nearly everyone, seems a natural fit for the School for Evil.
    I read this series before my children came across these books. I was drawn to the storyline and the idea of roles being chosen simply by looks. Upon further reading, we are forced to acknowledge external appearances do not always indicate the person within, and true love is friendship. The girls loved the series, and it gave us plenty to discuss.
  4. The Cat Who... (Lilian Jackson Braun) – A series of twenty-nine mystery novels and three related collections by Lilian Jackson Braun, featuring a reporter named Jim Qwilleran and his Siamese cats, Kao K’o-Kung (Koko for short) and Yum Yum.
    Not the most action packed of series, I do enjoy the mystery of each story and the silly antics attributed to Koko and YumYum. The books are clean and easy reading.

As we launch into a new month, it might be time to make decisions regarding new purchases and look for upcoming reads. Until then, we’re enjoying these great series and keeping our eyes peeled for books to enjoy. There’s no doubt we’ll find what we’re looking for, the question is how we’ll fit them all into our book box!

Your Turn!: Which series would you recommend; either juvenile or adult?

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The Read-Aloud Dilemma

Read_Aloud_Dilemma“Do we really have to sit here and listen, Mom? Please!” Four anxious faces stare back at me, waiting for my answer. Our current read-aloud story is supposed to be Robin Hood. The plan was to progress through the book together, taking in the beauty of the words and having an open discussion of ideas. Instead, my kids are hoping I’ll see things their way and the torture will end. We have a read-aloud dilemma and this mama’s praying for a solution.

Our stand-off might leave you with the impression our children dislike books in general. Let me assure you this is not true. Our children read an average of 100-150 books per week. Reading is not the issue. Reading aloud is not necessarily the issue either. We read our history and science lessons together daily and enjoy the experience. So what is the problem?

The Dilemma – The simple fact is reading aloud takes time. We need to be sitting down all together and work through the literature at a pace which will, on average, suit the entire family. This is difficult when you have children in a wide age range and some of your children are exceptionally fast readers. Reading aloud can additionally be challenged by children who naturally have shorter attention spans. Time dedicated for reading together might need to be short, and those children who are steeped in the read might balk at having to stop for the sake of other siblings.

While our children are all willing, and happy, to sit through read-alouds which directly pertain to our “learning day”, when it comes to fictional reads, all patience flies out the window. It seems we need a compromise.

The Compromise – I have reading lists which I’d like our children to work through, literature which would be of benefit or add beauty to their learning adventure. Rather than make them suffer through reading it as a group, these books are provided for them to read at their own pace. Often, our girls breeze through them quickly. My youngest and I slowly meander through his list with dedication, adding fun side trips to encourage a love of reading.

Outside our regular learning routine and during devotions, reading aloud as a family is generally done in the car! Those long drives to nature walks and field trips are the perfect opportunity to pop in a good audio book and enjoy a story. We can also pass around a novel, taking turns reading the book to the group.

The Discussion – As each of our children work through their reads, Mom is sure to keep an eye on progress and engage them in dialogue. We talk about favorite characters, lessons learned, world views, selections which we all found rather dull, passages which were beautiful beyond words, gentleman which were anything but, ladies who needed stiffer backbones, places we wish we could visit, and so much more. We laugh, groan, and sniffle together. As a few of us start in, the rest inevitably chime in with their thoughts or are encouraged to read faster in order to join in the conversation.

One key point I should probably highlight is that all assigned and highly recommended reads handed to our children are books I have read myself. Either I read them before handing them over or have read them in the past. If I am going to have an intelligent conversation with my children about key ideas and plot points, it would behoove me to know what they’re reading. As a side note, I would personally feel a hypocrite if I required my children to read something I had no intention of working through myself. My children take note of this and it makes an impression upon their hearts.

Now, four smiling faces urge me to, “Start the next story, please!” Happy voices remind everyone about our last read, while anxiously waiting to hear what is coming. We all settle in for the drive, and our minds are taken on a journey to another place even as our bodies are being transported on another adventure. Our read-aloud time is no longer a dilemma, but a delight.

“But continue thou in the things which thou hast learned and hast been assured of, knowing of whom thou hast learned;”
~ II Timothy 3:14-15

Your Turn!: How has your family dedicated time for reading aloud?

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Getting the Most From Our Reads

getting_the_most_our_readsSurprisingly, I read as much young adult fiction as my children do. I enjoy the genre and especially appreciate being able to share these books with my kiddos. Our family also delights in classic literature. We laugh, cry, and share some wonderful memories centered on great books. Together we’re getting the most from our reads.

In our family, reading books extends beyond the page. We soak up the words and make them come to life. Through conversation, play, and more, we use these steps to help us:

Read – No matter how we choose to read, sharing a book with our child can be fun. We pick one of the following methods and go to town:

  • Together – We snuggle on the couch, gather round the table, or cuddle in bed at night. No matter when or how, we enjoy the read as a family.
  • Alone – Some of our books make the rounds. Mom reads it first – making sure it’s a clean read – then it goes through the crowd, usually from the fastest reader down.

Story Coaster – After we finish our book, we hit the plot points. Were my younger children able to follow along? I use this time to ensure they understood who the main characters were and the focus of the story; reviewing vocabulary and literary terminology I wish for them to learn. Only a short amount of time is given to this, but it is well worth the few moments and our children have learned much in this practice.

Reenact – Depending on our chosen book, acting out portions of the story is included. While reading Little House on the Prairie, we might build a cabin with Lincoln Logs or do a little baking. Most stories inspire some form of hands-on activity to partake in.

Discuss – While the reading, in-and-of itself, is always a treat, I rarely leave a book without taking a moment to check in with my kids. I want to hear their thoughts on the read and cover important ground which the Lord has prompted me to share. This takes our book to a new level, moving past what’s on the page and encourages our children to correspond the story to reality.
A key-note: We launch conversations with open-ended questions. The goal is to get our children to talk, not merely answer “Yes” or “No”. We ask what our children liked/disliked about the book; what they learned; their favorite character/portion of the story; and their take on the book in general. As our children mature, we discuss world views which might be present. (One series which comes to mind is Hunger Games. These books launched many wonderful conversations about government and reform. The writing was not at its best, but the benefits from our talks was well worth the poor literature.)

Watch – If there’s a movie, we’re more than likely going to watch it. This launches entirely new discussions on difference between the two, which they liked better, and more. Plus, who doesn’t like a good movie?

Play – Did you know many popular books, authors, and publishers have websites filled with games and activities? For added fun, we enjoy hopping on to one of these sites and playing games which relate to our read. Our favorites are the The Chronicles of Narnia, Mysterious Benedict Society, and Harry Potter websites.

For those with littler children, or are unsure of where to start in their literary adventure, we highly recommend Five in a Row. With FIAR all the work is done for you! Each week, you follow a suggested read and enjoy the multitude of activities available. Included are questions to discuss with your children and additional resources. Once you’ve grown comfortable with the format, branch out and choose your own books.

We love great literature. By discussing these books and bringing them to life, we are creating wonderful memories and life-long lessons for our children to remember forever. Our books jump off the page and we get the most from our reads.

📢 Chime In!: What is your favorite part of reading a book?

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When Your Child Hates to Read

when_your_child_hates_to_readWe’ve been blessed in raising four children who love to read. But occasionally, one of our children will go through a phase where nothing appeals to them. There is no book mom can suggest and no genre which appeals to them. What’s a parent to do when their child is going through this difficult time; and what if this isn’t just a ‘stage’ and our child truly hates to read?

If our child is going through a stage where reading is no longer of interest, or has never experienced the joy of reading, it can seem impossible to spark the flame of desire. Is there hope?

Be Prayerful – You know me! Everything – but everything – starts with prayer. Encouraging a love of reading is no different. If our children are struggling in this area, we need to be asking the Lord to soften their hearts and open their minds to this skill. He can do what we cannot. We pray for an increase in their interest, and wisdom on our behalf to show them the way.

Set An Example – Expressing joy over our own reads encourages our children to pick up books. Our enthusiasm can be infectious. Are we reading often and consistently? We might share what we’re reading, exciting plot twists, what we’ve learned, and how this book has sparked our imagination. Reading our Bible daily is also important. Our children will mimic what they see us live out.

Show Patience – Yelling, belittling, grumbling, and nagging aren’t going to encourage our children to pick up that book buried under piles of dust. Our children need to hear about literature in a positive light and see grace lived out.

Be Creative – Great literature doesn’t only come in book form. We might consider reading aloud to our child, listening to books on tape, or attending book reading events. We want our children to experience the joy of the story, not stress over the reading of words. Given time, the reading will follow.

Talk It Out – Is there a genre our children like more than others? Before we hand them Shakespeare and ask them to enjoy, we might start with something more on their level and in their interest range. Perhaps we’re choosing books which are not challenging enough. Our child might need to step up their game.

Start Small – Just because our children know how to read, doesn’t mean they are ready for War and Peace. We might begin with littler books, or even books which seem like twaddle (shudder) but inspire our children to explore more. Our goal is to start the flame, then build. Eventually War and Peace might not seem out of reach.

It helps when I keep things in perspective. Our goal is to raise righteous children who love the Lord. We want them to enthusiastically read their Bibles. But if my focus shifts out-of-place and becomes the ever-impressive list of books my child has read, the Lord might be using this to teach me a lesson.

May the Lord help each of us to find balance in this area of our lives. May we have patience to reach our children where they are, wisdom to help them overcome this obstacle, and grace to lead our children in joy.

“Be joyful in hope, patient in affliction, faithful in prayer.”
~ Romans 12:12

📢 Chime In!: Have any of your children expressed disinterest in reading? Share with us how you’ve helped – or are helping – your littles through this challenging time.

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Work Hard, Play Harder: The Read-a-thon

“There is a time for everything, and a season for every activity under the heavens…” (Ecc. 3:1) Join us as we explore a season of fun and family! Help us discover new ways to enjoy family time and build lasting memories.

……

Summer_work-playI am an avid reader. Everyone in my immediate family is; from the man, all the way down to the little man. Us in a bookstore is a dangerous thing, my friend. One way our family enjoys having fun is through our local library, participating in the summer reading program.

Now, I understand that reading it not fun for everyone. For those who do not enjoy, I am truly sorry. There is an entire world you are missing.

As parents, one way we can inspire our children to read, is to read ourselves! Whenever a parent shares their struggle in getting a child to read, the first question I ask is how often they, as parents, read. Often, the answer is, “hardly ever”. We cannot expect our children to do that which we do not model for them. If you want your children to enjoy reading, you must be excited about reading yourself.

Back to the point at hand… One way to encourage a love of reading in the entire family, is the summer reading program! Everyone, from pop down to the little people, are free to join in. (Disclaimer: I should specify that our local library has a program for everyone; no matter the age. I understand not all libraries do this.)

During the summer reading program, we turn in weekly reading logs to earn prizes for our hard work. At the end of summer, there are special prizes awarded to those with the most reading tickets! Our kids walk away each week with a cute, little prize. I usually walk away with raffle tickets towards the bigger prizes.

At the end of summer, the library hosts a huge end of summer party. For completing the reading program, you get tickets for free ice cream, face painting, balloon animals, and more!

Paws to Read

So, what do you do if your library doesn’t host a summer reading program? If you have the time, I would highly recommend organizing a committee to get a program started! Offer to help out at the library or find out how to bring such a program to your area. Lacking in time? (Aren’t we all?) Consider hosting your own ‘family reading program’! Set a goal for each member of your family and announce prizes for each week’s goal. At the end of the summer, have a party to celebrate all your hard work and remember all the fun books you’ve read.

Our library picks a theme each year. In fact, I think the entire state of California is using this current theme. This year, we are focusing on “Paws to Read”. Get it? We are using an animal theme to help children get excited about reading. We are welcome to read any book in the library, but we get extra credit for reading books about animals; fiction or non.

Reading is loads of fun! (At least for us.) I cannot imagine summer time without the summer reading program. For our family, the reading program also means lots of fun and tons of memories.

Time to Chime In: What is your fondest memory from a summer reading experience?